August 20, 2012
Six Guidelines for Writing Creative Nonfiction

via writingforward

With poetry and fiction, there are techniques we can use to invigorate our writing, but there aren’t many rules beyond the standards of grammar and good writing in general. We can let our imaginations run wild; everything from nonsense to outrageous fantasy is fair game for bringing our ideas to life when we’re writing fiction and poetry.

However, with creative nonfiction, there are some guidelines that we have to follow. These guidelines aren’t set in stone and there aren’t any nonfiction police patrolling bookstores, waiting to arrest you if you stray from the guidelines. These guidelines might be considered best practices, except if you violate them, you might find yourself in hot water with your readers.

What is Creative Nonfiction?

What sets creative nonfiction apart from fiction or poetry?

For starters, creative nonfiction is factual. A memoir is not just any story; it’s a true story. A biography is the real account of someone’s life. There is no room in creative nonfiction for fabrication or manipulation of the facts.

So what makes creative nonfiction writing different from something like textbook writing or technical writing? What makes it creative?

Nonfiction writing that isn’t considered creative usually has business or academic purposes. Such writing isn’t designed to entertain or even be enjoyable. It’s sole purpose is to convey information, usually in a dry, straightforward manner.

Creative nonfiction, on the other hand, pays credence to the craft of writing, often through literary techniques, which make the prose aesthetically pleasing and bring layers of meaning to the context. It is similar to fiction in that it usually uses a story structure and is written in prose.

There are many different genres within creative nonfiction: memoir, biography, autobiography, and personal essays, just to name a few.

Writing Creative Nonfiction

Here are six simple guidelines to follow when writing creative nonfiction:

  1. Get your facts straight. It doesn’t matter if you’re writing your own story or someone else’s. When readers, publishers, and the media find out that you’ve taken liberty with the truth of what happened, you and your work will be ridiculed, scrutinized, and you’ll lose credibility. If you can’t help yourself from lying, then think about writing fiction instead.
  2. Issue a disclaimer. Most nonfiction is written from memory and we all know that human memory is deeply flawed. It’s almost impossible to recall a conversation word for word. You might forget minor details, like the color of a dress or the make and model of a car. If you aren’t sure about the details but are determined to include them, be upfront and plan on issuing a disclaimer that clarifies the creative liberties you’ve taken.
  3. Consider the repercussions. If you’re writing about other people (even if they are secondary figures), you might want to check with them before you publish your nonfiction. Some people are extremely private and don’t want any details of their lives published. Others might request that you leave certain things out, which they feel are personal. Otherwise, make sure you’ve weighed the repercussions of revealing other people’s lives to the world. Relationships have been both strengthened and destroyed as a result of published creative nonfiction.
  4. Be objective. You don’t need to be overly objective if you’re telling your own, personal story. However, nobody wants to read a highly biased biography. Book reviews for biographies are packed with heavy criticism for authors who didn’t fact-check or provide references and for those who leave out important information or pick and choose which details to include to make the subject look good or bad.
  5. Pay attention to language. You’re not writing a textbook, so make full use of language, literary devices, and storytelling techniques.
  6. Know your audience. Creative nonfiction sells, but you must have an interested audience. A memoir about an ordinary person’s first year of college isn’t especially interesting. Who’s going to read it? However, memoir about someone with a learning disability navigating the first year of college is quite compelling, and there’s an identifiable audience for it. With creative nonfiction, a clearly defined audience is essential.

  1. librarygeekgirl reblogged this from writersfriend
  2. study-samurai reblogged this from writersfriend
  3. 1966journal reblogged this from writersfriend
  4. circlenowsquared reblogged this from livewritedream
  5. invisiblequalities reblogged this from beatwritersbane
  6. 17xinfinity reblogged this from livewritedream
  7. commonplacerfollowshisbrush reblogged this from writersfriend
  8. word-manipulation reblogged this from livewritedream
  9. fingersxxcrossed reblogged this from beatwritersbane and added:
    Currently working on a non-fiction unit in my creative writing course. Major helpful; thank you!
  10. livewritedream reblogged this from beatwritersbane
  11. beatwritersbane reblogged this from writersfriend
  12. roleplayerstips reblogged this from writersfriend
  13. susiefried reblogged this from writersfriend
  14. ghoulishgraveyardofcrap reblogged this from writersfriend
  15. writersfriend posted this